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    Pastel, 53x63cm. Bernard Dunstan R.A., N.E.A.C., R.W.A. b.1920 Born in Middlesex, he is married to the painter Diana Armfield. He studied at the Byam Shaw School of Art and then at the Slade.His reputation has owed much to his intimate interiors and nude studies reminiscent of the Degas and Sickert tradition. A much respected painter he has justifiably an enthusiastic following. He was elected a member of the Royal Academy in 1968 and his work is held in important public collections.
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    Oil on Canvas, 88x108cm. Garnet Ruskin Wolseley 1884 - 1967 Provenance : Ex private collection, It seems likely that the children depicted in this work are the daughters of Lamorna Birch and the setting is Lamorna in Cornwall. Garnet Wolseley started his formal training under Herbert Van Herkomer continuing his studies at the Slade under Henry Tonks and Fred Brown where he won a gold medal. In 1908 aged 24 he moved to Newlyn, quickly forging a close relationship with Harold and Laura Knight who had moved from Staithes the previous year. Both these artists had a considerable effect on his development as an artist.
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    Oil on Canvas, 22x16cm. Maccrossan 1863 - 1934 Ex private collection. Provenance: Royal Academy Exhibit 1898 'White Gigs' no. 513 (This was Mary Maccrossans first Royal Academy Exhibit, purchased by the Liverpool Corporation in 1928). One of the most gifted of the early St. Ives painters, Mary Maccrossan won the acclaim of not only her critics but also her fellow artists. She was born in Liverpool and studied at the Liverpool School of Art then at Delacluse's in Paris and finally in St. Ives with Julius Olsson. This exceptional work with its silver grey palette illustrates her at her best. She exhibited at numerous leading London and Provincial galleries. Further details available on request.
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    George F. Gregory 1815 - 1885 Born in England, he began his working life as a draughtsman with the Thames Iron Works. He set sail for Australia in 1848 at the time of the 1848 gold rush. By 1854 he had established himself as a specialist marine painter in Melbourne. His style has a tendency to the naive which gives his work a considerable charm. It would seem he was reasonably successful as a good number of his works survive in both private and public collections. The Peabody Museum of Salem holds three examples of his work.
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    Oil on Board, 11x17cm. Carruthers Gould R.B.A., R.W.A. 1870 - 1948 The son of the Victorian caricaturist Sir Francis Carruthers Gould lived for many years at Doverhay in Porlock. He first exhibited at the principal London Galleries from 1892 and was elected a member of both the R.B.A. and the R.W.A. He produced a good deal of work in both oil and water-colour of Exmoor and the surrounding countryside and has an enthusiastic following.
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    Oil on Canvas, 56x40cm. Joseph Horlor 1809 - 1887 One of the best known West Country painters of his period and like many others working at this time he visited Wales on frequent occasions. He adopted a free and loose style and his sense of light for dramatic effect is highly succesful. He exhibited at the Royal Academy, Suffolk Street and other principal galleries.
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    Oil on Board, 42x36cm. Ronald Ossory Dunlop R.A., R.B.A., N.E.A.C., L.G. 1896-1973 Provenance: Ex private collection. Born in Dublin, a painter of figure subjects, landscapes, portraits and still life. He was educated at Saffron Walden in Essex and worked for an advertising agency from the age of nineteen and after the First World War abandoned this for painting. He attended evening classes at the Wimbledon School of Art, and also studied in Manchester and Paris. In 1923 he founded the Emotionist Group of Writers and Artists. He held his first one-man show in 1928 at the Redfern Gallery. His work is represented in numerous public collections.
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    Derwent Lees Provenance: The Fine Art Society 1886 - 1931 Born in Australia he studied in Melbourne and then in Paris. He then arrived in London to attend the Slade School from 1905 - 1907. While still undergoing his studies he was invited to join the academic staff and he taught drawing at the Slade from 1908 - 1918. His close associates included J. D. Innes and Augustus John and around this period he worked with them in Dorset and Wales painting lyrical landscapes in vivid colours on small wooden panels. He travelled widely in Europe and during 1912 - 1914 he visited the south of France. Derwent Lees met his wife Edith Brice known as Lyndra, through Augustus John for whom she has modelled 'The Edwardians', and 'Secrets and Desires'. Derwent Lees died in Surrey in 1931.
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    Oil on Canvas, 13x17cm. Stirling 1820 - 1871 Provenance: Exhibited at the Royal Academy 1853. John Stirling first exhibited three portraits at the Royal Academy in 1852. In the same year Holman Hunt's masterpiece 'The Hireling Shepherd' was hung in the Academy and it is more than likely that John Stirling would have seen the work of the Pre-Raphaelites for the first time on a visit to London from Aberdeen to see his own work hung. The work of the Pre-Raphaelites was first seen in 1849 and the brotherhood existed for a period of about five years from that date. It seems certain that John Stirling was impressed by the work of the Pre-Raphaelites and was influenced by them when he produced his painting 'The Lassie and the Lamb', which was exhibited at the Academy in 1853. The technique used by such artists as Holman Hunt and Millais was to paint in pure colour on a white, wet ground which produced a distinctive luminosity as was a technique Stirling also employed in 'The Lassie and the Lamb'. Similarly, the Pre-Raphaelite's great attention to detail and most particularly in the cases of Hunt and Millais, their wish to reflect nature accurately is reflected in John Stirling's painting. While the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was not without its detractors, Charles Dickens for one, its great champion was the foremost Victorian critic and painter John Ruskin. He took notice of the work of John Stirling and in 'Academy Notes' of 1855 commented on Stirling's Academy painting: 'The Scottish Presbyterians' describing it as '...a very acceptable picture, showing careful study and good discrimination.' The title of the painting 'The Lassie and the Lamb' is taken from Wordsworth's poem 'The Pet Lamb', a pastoral. In later works, the artist took poetry for a direct inspiration for his subjects which were the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood's oeuvre. The Pre-Raphaelites had a considerable influence on a number of painters and there can be little doubt that John Stirling's painting 'The Lassie and the Lamb' falls safely into the Pre-Raphaelite category. John Stirling exhibited his first works at the Royal Academy in 1852 and continued to exhibit there until 1871, the year he died. His first paintings were exhibited from an Aberdeen address, although it seems he also lived in London, since the pictures were sent both from Aberdeen and London during his active years. A number of his later works are a result of his visits to Morocco in 1868 and 1869. His three exhibits at the Royal Academy in 1869 were 'Al Sok', a market in Morocco, 'Repas Honnetre' and Al-Ghirab, a water seller in Morocco.
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    Etching, 34x40cm. William Lee Hankey R.W.S., R.I., R.O.I., R.E., N.S. 1869 - 1952 Provenance : Ex private collection. Lee Hankey studied under Walter Schroeder at the Royal College of Art having spent an earlier period at the Chester School of Art. He later continued his studies in Paris. He exhibited at many of the principal London galleries from 1893, gaining election to a number of important societies. In 1902 he was elected president of the London Sketch Club. He won a gold medal at the Barcelona International Exhibition and a bronze medal in Chicago. He also exhibited at the Paris Salon and other important galleries. He spent much of his time in the French countryside painting the everyday life of the French peasant. This is a particularly fine etching by the artist in a medium in which he excelled.
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    Oil on Canvas, 28x22cm. Mason b.1947 Barry Mason specialises in painting historical naval subjects and deep sea sailing ships. He studied at the Exeter College of Art for three years. Exhibited at the R.S.M.A. from 1973.
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    Oil on Canvas, 40x32cm. Jacobus Matthys Damschroeder 1825 - 1905 Born in Germany, Jan Damschroeder spent most of his life working in Amsterdam, where we believe this work to be set. He specialised in genre paintings, often with the inclusion of children. A painting entitled 'The Village School' was sold at a London auction house c.1900 for what was then the considerable sum of 30 guineas. Damschroeder worked in both oils and watercolours, often painting on a more modest scale than this example. It would seem that this is a major large work and was painted as an exhibition piece.
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    Oil on Canvas, 37x40cm. Costa 1867-1931 An important portrait from the Newlyn School by the highly desirable portrait painter John da Costa. The painting is signed and importantly dated 1890 when Newlyn painting and painters were at the height of their influence in British art. In 1890 a writer mentioned Stanhope Forbes' old studio and then went on 'Now it is occupied by the youngest member of the Newlyn colony, Mr. John da Costa, fresh from the Paris schooles, and barely twenty three, has yet had a picture on the line at the Grovesnor and another at the Academy'. John da Costa was born in Teignmouth and was recognised as an artist of great potential early in his career by Frederick, Lord Leighton. He received awards at the Paris Salon in 1906 and 1907, and he was a member of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters and the Royal Society of Portrait Painters. In 1974 a memorial exhibition was dedicated to John da Costa of paintings from the collection of Mrs. Elizabeth M. Richards at Leighton House, London.
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    Oil on Board, 60x80cm. Joyce Critchley Haddon R.B.A., N.E.A.C. b.1915 Joyce Haddon studied at Cambridge and the Royal Academy schools where she won the Creswick medal for landscape and the Landseer prize for landscape, drawing and painting from the antique. Her work was exhibited at the Royal Academy with exhibitions in Paris, Sydney, Belfast, Birmingham and many more. She was elected a member of the Royal Society of British Artists and the New English Art Club, showing her work regularly at their annual exhibitions. Her daughter, the journalist Celia Haddon said of her mother, 'she saw the inward light in the commonplace'.
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    Oil on Canvas, 63x52cm. Freda Marston R.B.A., R.O.I. 1895-1949 Freda Marston, nee Culow was born in Hampstead, and studied at the very first polytechnic - Regent Street Polytechnic, founded in 1838 - followed by four years in Italy with John Terrick Williams R.A. Williams was a landscapist working in oils, watercolour and pastels, and his luminescent style greatly influenced his pupil. In 1922 she married another landscape painter, Reginald St. Clair Marston (1886-1943). She was a prolific artist, exhibiting at the Royal Academy, the Royal Society of British Artists, the Royal Institute of Oil Painters, the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours, the Royal Society of Artists Birmingham, the Glasgow Institute of Fine Arts, Manchester City Art Gallery, and the Royal Society of Women Artists. She was elected to the R.B.A. in 1924 and the R.O.I. in 1925. She was also the only female artist commissioned by British Rail, the London, Midland and Scottish, and the London and North Eastern Railways to produce prosters and the shallow horizontal paintings used for artwork in the railways carriages. Works in public collections include Flood the Amberley (Towner Art Gallery); Duncombe Park, Yorkshire and Lastingham, Yorkshire, both original British Railway carriage prints (National Railway Musuem).
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    Aldridge 1850 - 1933 A good early example of a marine oil dating from the 19th century by the well known Worthing artist Frederick James Aldridge. Aldridge lived all his eighty three years in Worthing and was a regular visitor to Cowes Regatta for fifty years. Highly collectable, he was a regular exhibitor at the London galleries including the Royal Academy. On his death an obituary appeared in the Times which commented that he had 'established an international reputation especially in British Commonwealth countries.'