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    Watercolour, 10x7cm. William Bernard Reid exh. 1916 - 1938 A stunning early example from the Edinburgh artist, unmistakably Scottish. Reid specialised in figures in landscape to great effect. He exhibited at the Royal Academy, Glasgow Institute, Royal Scottish Academy etc.
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    Oil on Canvas, 118x64cm. Nathaniel Hughes John Baird R.O.I. 1865 - 1935 Nathaniel Baird was born in Yetholm in Roxburghshire and was the son of John Baird the minister who is famed for his work in reforming the gypsy population and particularly for the founding of the first 'Ragged Schools'. Baird first studied under his father and then at the Coldstream Academy, Edinburgh, then London and later Paris. He had his first Royal Academy work accepted in 1883 and exhibited at many of the principal galleries from that date including the R.O.I. of which he was elected a member. He was equally at home with both oil and watercolour and a favourite subject was the heavy horse at work. He continued to exhibit until the 1930's. He moved to Devon in 1880 living at Dawlish where he was given an interesting commission by the Miller family of Torquay to paint portraits of the family. One of the sitters was the youngest daughter Agatha who was to gain worldwide fame as the crime writer Agatha Christie. Following the death of his wife in 1919 he moved from Devon to Sussex where he died in 1935.
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    Pastel, 53x63cm. Bernard Dunstan R.A., N.E.A.C., R.W.A. b.1920 Born in Middlesex, he is married to the painter Diana Armfield. He studied at the Byam Shaw School of Art and then at the Slade.His reputation has owed much to his intimate interiors and nude studies reminiscent of the Degas and Sickert tradition. A much respected painter he has justifiably an enthusiastic following. He was elected a member of the Royal Academy in 1968 and his work is held in important public collections.
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    Oil on Canvas, 13x17cm. Stirling 1820 - 1871 Provenance: Exhibited at the Royal Academy 1853. John Stirling first exhibited three portraits at the Royal Academy in 1852. In the same year Holman Hunt's masterpiece 'The Hireling Shepherd' was hung in the Academy and it is more than likely that John Stirling would have seen the work of the Pre-Raphaelites for the first time on a visit to London from Aberdeen to see his own work hung. The work of the Pre-Raphaelites was first seen in 1849 and the brotherhood existed for a period of about five years from that date. It seems certain that John Stirling was impressed by the work of the Pre-Raphaelites and was influenced by them when he produced his painting 'The Lassie and the Lamb', which was exhibited at the Academy in 1853. The technique used by such artists as Holman Hunt and Millais was to paint in pure colour on a white, wet ground which produced a distinctive luminosity as was a technique Stirling also employed in 'The Lassie and the Lamb'. Similarly, the Pre-Raphaelite's great attention to detail and most particularly in the cases of Hunt and Millais, their wish to reflect nature accurately is reflected in John Stirling's painting. While the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was not without its detractors, Charles Dickens for one, its great champion was the foremost Victorian critic and painter John Ruskin. He took notice of the work of John Stirling and in 'Academy Notes' of 1855 commented on Stirling's Academy painting: 'The Scottish Presbyterians' describing it as '...a very acceptable picture, showing careful study and good discrimination.' The title of the painting 'The Lassie and the Lamb' is taken from Wordsworth's poem 'The Pet Lamb', a pastoral. In later works, the artist took poetry for a direct inspiration for his subjects which were the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood's oeuvre. The Pre-Raphaelites had a considerable influence on a number of painters and there can be little doubt that John Stirling's painting 'The Lassie and the Lamb' falls safely into the Pre-Raphaelite category. John Stirling exhibited his first works at the Royal Academy in 1852 and continued to exhibit there until 1871, the year he died. His first paintings were exhibited from an Aberdeen address, although it seems he also lived in London, since the pictures were sent both from Aberdeen and London during his active years. A number of his later works are a result of his visits to Morocco in 1868 and 1869. His three exhibits at the Royal Academy in 1869 were 'Al Sok', a market in Morocco, 'Repas Honnetre' and Al-Ghirab, a water seller in Morocco.
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    Oil on Board, 11x7cm. A painter, illustrator and writer Reg Gammon was born in Petersfield, Hampshire. In 1918 Muirhead Bone offered to get him into the Slade School but he declined as he had married. He took up instead a career as a writer and illustrator working for 'Punch' and for cycling and motoring magazines. Following the end of World War II, he moved back to the Black Mountains in Wales and became a hill farmer. It was in 1958 that Reg decided to become a full-time painter and moved to Somerset, setting up his studio in Cannington. His principal influence was Gaugin and this is evident in his lively pure palette. He achieved considerable success and was a member of both the R.W.A. and the R.O.I. In 1990 he published his biography 'One Man's Furrow, 90 years of country living'.
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    Oil on Board, 12x15cm. Oliver b.1927 Born in Jersey in the Channel Islands in 1927, he started painting during a prolonged illness and went on to study first at Exeter for his diploma in Painting and subsequently post-graduate studies in Liverpool. While still a student he exhibited work at the Redfern Gallery, London, and with the Royal Society of British Artists. Since those early days Peter Oliver has maintained strong links with the Redfern Gallery and has had a number of one-man shows with them. He has exhibited regularly in London and has also exhibited at the City Art Gallery in Salford. His work is in many collections, including the Tate Gallery, the Courtauld Institute, Manchester City Art Gallery and in the U.S.A. with the Fielding Collection New York, the Charles Berenson Collection etc.
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    Oil on Canvas, 8x14cm. Edward Matthew Hale R.O.I. 1852 - 1904 Edward Mathew Hale studied in Paris from 1873-1875 under Cabanel and Carolus Duran. He was the official war artist for the London Illustrated News during the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-1878. He exhibited with considerable success at many of the principle London galleries including the Royal Academy and was elected a member of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters. A painting was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1893.
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    Watercolour, 11x10cm. Susan Bower R.O.I., R.B.A. b.1953 Born in Yorkshire she was a student of William Selby. Her paintings, often figurative, reveal a world of experiences and situations translated through a degree of abstraction. Elected a member of the R.O.I. in 1992 and a member of the R.B.A. in 1998 she has exhibited at numerous principal galleries including the Royal Academy. She was awarded the Cuthbert Mill prize in 1996 at the R.B.A., the Le Clese Medal in 1998 at the R.O.I. and the Alan Gourley Memorial award in 2000.
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    Watercolour, 70x90cm. Ruskin Spear R.A. 1911 - 1990 Born in Hammersmith, London, where he spent most of his life and which he frequently painted. An attack of polio as a child badly affected one leg so he attended Brook Green School for crippled children. At the age of fifteen he won a scholarship to the Hammersmith School of Art, another scholarship in 1930 taking him to the Royal College of Art for four year under William Rotherstein. Essentially an English painter in the Sickert tradition, his working class background was reflected in his pictures of seedy back streets and bar room life. An important painter, he painted many portraits, including Winston Churchill, Princess Anne, Margaret Thatcher, Lord Hailsham, Lord Olivier et al.
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    Oil on Canvas, 11x17cm. Arthur White 1865 - 1953 An early member of the St. Ives School, he was born in Sheffield and studied art at the Sheffield School of Art under Henry Archer and J. T. Cook from 1880. He exhibited in London, including at the Royal Institute of Oil Painters and in the provinces. Much of his working life was spent in St. Ives and St. Ives itself was the inspiration for much of his work. He was a member of the St. Ives Society of Artists.
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    Oil on Canvas, 16x26cm. Winifred Wilson c. 1910 - 1978 An interesting painter, a farmer by profession and a pupil of Arnesby Brown, whose influence can be seen in this stunning early work. She met with considerable success, exhibiting at the Royal Academy, Royal Institute, the Paris Salon and America. The Graves Art Gallery in Sheffield holds her work. She lived for much of her life in Barlow, near Sheffield and was the sister of the painters May and Violet Wilson.
  • Watercolour, 11x17cm. James Barnes 1870 - 1920 James Barnes exhibited a staggering 131 works at the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool, during his lifetime. A painter of great skill, his work has a wonderful ethereal feeling, as well as the genuine touch of the Liverpool school at this period. He appears to have spent his entire working life in Liverpool, and his commitment to the Walker Art Gallery is obvious. He exhibited at the principal galleries, both in the provinces and London, including the Royal academy. The theme of this painting appears to have been a particular favourite of the artist.
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    Oil on Canvas, 16x19cm. Newton Sutherland exh. 1908 - 1915 A painting in the true Scottish tradition and wonderfully atmospheric. Allan Sutherland lived in Glasgow and exhibited at the Royal Scottish Academy, Glasgow Institute and the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Water-Colours. With a talented artist such as Sutherland it is interesting that he ceased to exhibit after 1915 but this was in fact very common as World War I claimed the lives of many promising painters.
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    Oil on Canvas, 14x17cm. Fulton R.S.W.A. 1848 - 1930 Fulton was born in Parkhead near Glasgow, and studied at the Glasgow School of Art. He was elected R.S.W. in 1890 and had a long and successful career exhibiting at the London galleries and abroad. He excelled at this type of subject, capturing the landscape of rural Scotland in a sensitive and original manner. He lived and worked for most of his life in Glasgow, exhibiting at both The Royal Scottish Academy and the Glasgow Institute.
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    Oil on Board, Signed Verso, 90x60cm. Edmund Gill 1820 - 1894 Born in London, Edmund Gill was highly successful during his lifetime and made a speciality of painting waterfalls, which earned him the nickname 'Waterfall Gill'. He met David Cox in 1841 in Birmingham, which was to prove an inspiration to him. He first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1842 and he continued to show there until 1886. He lived at various time in London, Ludlow and Hereford. Much of his subject matter is taken from the landscape of Wales and Scotland ; this example was probably painted in North Wales.
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    Oil on Board, 11x17cm. Carruthers Gould R.B.A., R.W.A. 1870 - 1948 The son of the Victorian caricaturist Sir Francis Carruthers Gould lived for many years at Doverhay in Porlock. He first exhibited at the principal London Galleries from 1892 and was elected a member of both the R.B.A. and the R.W.A. He produced a good deal of work in both oil and water-colour of Exmoor and the surrounding countryside and has an enthusiastic following.