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    Frederick Brown N.E.A.C. 1851 - 1941 One of the most influential artists and teachers of his period, Fred Brown was one of the founding members with George Clausen, Sargent and Wilson Steer of the New English Art Club which held its first exhibition in 1886. Born in Chelmsford, Essex he was the son of a painter and art teacher. He studied first at the Royal College of Art and later in Paris under Bouguereau and Tom Fleury. He exhibited at numerous principal London galleries including the Royal Academy where he showed his celebrated work 'Hard Times'. He was Slade Professor from 1892 - 1918 and had an enormous influence on many of the most successful British painters of the early 20th Century. His work is held in a number of public collections including the Victoria and Albert Museum. He died in Richmond, Surrey in 1941 and had acquired an extensive collection of modern British paintings.
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    Thomas Stothard R.A. Provenance: J. S. Maas & Co Ltd., New Bond S 1755 - 1834 Born in London, attended school at Acomb, yadcaster and Ilford, Essex. Apprenticed to a draughtsman of patterns for brocaded silks in Spitalfields, and during his spare time he attempted illustrations for the works of his favourite poets. In 1778 he became a student of the Royal Academy, of which he was elected associate in 1792 and full academician in 1794. Among his earliest book illustrations are plates engraved for Ossian and for Bell's Poets; and in 1780 he became a regular contributor to the Novelist's Magazine, for which he produced 148 designs, including his eleven illustrations to Peregrine Pickle and his graceful subjects from Clarissa and Sir Charles Grandison. From 1786, Thomas Fielding, a friend of Stothard`s and engraver, produced engravings using designs of Stothard, Angelika Kauffmann, and of his own. He designed plates for pocket-books, tickets for concerts, illustrations to almanacs, portraits of popular actors. Among his more important series are the two sets of illustrations to Robinson Crusoe, one for the New Magazine and one for Stockdale's edition, and the plates to The Pilgrim's Progress, to Harding's edition of Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield, to The Rape of the Lock , to the works of Solomon Gessner, to William Cowper's Poems, and to The Decameron; while his figure-subjects in the superb editions of Samuel Rogers's Italy and Poems prove that even in old age his imagination was still fertile, and his hand firm. He is at his best in subjects of a domestic or a gracefully ideal sort; the heroic and the tragic were beyond his powers.His oil pictures are usually small in size. Their colouring is often rich and glowing, being founded upon the practice of Rubens, of whom Stothard was a great admirer. The "Vintage," perhaps his most important oil painting, is in the National Gallery. He was a contributor to John Boydell's Shakespeare Gallery, but his best-known painting is the "Procession of the Canterbury Pilgrims," also in the National Gallery, the engraving from which, begun by Luigi and continued by Niccolo Schiavonetti and finished by James Heath, was immensely popular. The commission for this picture was given to Stothard by Robert Hartley Cromek, and was the cause of a quarrel with his friend William Blake. It was followed by a companion work, the "Flitch of Bacon," which was drawn in sepia for the engraver but was never carried out in colour. In addition to his easel pictures, Stothard decorated the grand staircase of Burghley House, near Stamford in Lincolnshire, with subjects of War, Intemperance, and the Descent of Orpheus in Hell (1799-1803); the mansion of Hafod, North Wales, with a series of scenes from Froissart and Monstrelet (1810); the cupola of the upper hall of the Advocates' Library, Edinburgh (later occupied by the Signet Library), with Apollo and the Muses, and figures of poets, orators, etc. (1822); and he prepared designs for a frieze and other decorations for Buckingham Palace, which were not executed, owing to the death of George IV. He also designed the magnificent shield presented to the Duke of Wellington by the merchants of London, and executed with his own hand a series of eight etchings from the various subjects which adorned it. In the British Museum is a collection, in four volumes, of engravings of Stothard's works, made by Robert Balmanno.
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    Milner R.B.C., R.W.A. d.1939 An artist with a long association with the early St. Ives School he specialised in landscapes. Born in Yorkshire he studied at the Wakefield and Doncaster Schools of Art and later at the Slade in London. He first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1892 and from that date was a regular exhibitor at the leading galleries in London, the provinces and abroad. His work is held in several public collections.
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    Aldridge 1850 - 1933 A good early example of a marine oil dating from the 19th century by the well known Worthing artist Frederick James Aldridge. Aldridge lived all his eighty three years in Worthing and was a regular visitor to Cowes Regatta for fifty years. Highly collectable, he was a regular exhibitor at the London galleries including the Royal Academy. On his death an obituary appeared in the Times which commented that he had 'established an international reputation especially in British Commonwealth countries.'
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    Derwent Lees Provenance: The Fine Art Society 1886 - 1931 Born in Australia he studied in Melbourne and then in Paris. He then arrived in London to attend the Slade School from 1905 - 1907. While still undergoing his studies he was invited to join the academic staff and he taught drawing at the Slade from 1908 - 1918. His close associates included J. D. Innes and Augustus John and around this period he worked with them in Dorset and Wales painting lyrical landscapes in vivid colours on small wooden panels. He travelled widely in Europe and during 1912 - 1914 he visited the south of France. Derwent Lees met his wife Edith Brice known as Lyndra, through Augustus John for whom she has modelled 'The Edwardians', and 'Secrets and Desires'. Derwent Lees died in Surrey in 1931.
  • Oil on Canvas, 43x52cm. Charles William Wyllie ROI, RBA 1853 - 1923 Charles Wyllie was the younger brother of William Lionel Wyllie and in his youth showed such promise that he had his first painting hung in the Royal Academy at the age of thirteen. He worked both in oil and watercolour and his subjects, though of a shipping nature, tended to be mainly of harbour, river or canal scenes. During World War I he worked as a naval camouflage expert. He exhibited at the Royal Academy, New Watercolour Society, Suffolk Street and the Grosvenor Gallery and was a member of the Royal Institute of Painters. The National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, has two examples of his work and the Tate Gallery has 'Digging for Bait' which was bought by the Chantrey Bequest.
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    R.B.A., Provenance: The British Galleries c.1890 exh. 1880 - 1897 An important painting by this distinctive Victorian painter. Fred Hines lived in Essex and London painting mostly in watercolour choosing rural subject matter, which he portrayed in a romantic and sensitive style. He achieved considerable success exhibiting his works at the Royal Academy and numerous leading London galleries.
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    Oil on Canvas, 68x79cm. Donkin exh. 1880 - 1909 Signed with a monogram and dated 1882. A stunning example of 'Staithes School' painting, painted before the formation of the Newlyn School in Cornwall. This type of subject matter has become very rare, painted at a time when this type of subject matter was in the main romanticised in the typical manner. Little is known of the early life of Alice Donkin although she is recorded as living at various times in Berkshire and London. She obviously had considerable success during her lifetime as she exhibited at numerous important leading London galleries exhibiting with the Dudley Gallery, London Salon, Royal Society of British Artists, Royal Institute of Oil Painters, Society of Women Artists, Royal Academy etc.
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    Oil, 40x30cm. Anthony Park R.O.I., R.B.A. 1880 - 1962 Park moved to St. Ives at the age of 18 and became probably the best known of the early St. Ives painters. He studied under Julian Olsson who encouraged him to study in Paris. From 1905 he attended the Atelier Colarossi where he was a contemporary of Modigliani. Strongly influenced by the French Impressionists, Park's work is always brightly coloured and spontaneous. He had worked in the cotton mills of his native Lancashire throughout much of his childhood. Although he had no official training during his first years painting in St. Ives, Park was fortunate enough to meet Julius Olsson, one of the earliest arrivals among the many painters who had settled in St. Ives towards the end of the nineteenth century. Olsson was the founder of the new School of Landscape and Marine Painting which he had set up in his own studio overlooking Porthmeor Beach. He offered Park free tuition on account of his willingness to learn and natural ability and within six years of arriving in St. Ives, Park had begun exhibiting at the Royal Academy and it was at this time, with Olsson's guidance, that he decided to continue his training in the ateliers of Paris. Returning to St. Ives in 1923, Park found the old fishing port provided him with countless subjects among the many boats coming and going in the busy harbour and the overlapping forms of the fisherman's cottages rising steeply on the hill overlooking the port. Park exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1905 to 1949 and he was elected as a member of the Royal Society of Oil Painters in 1923. He was a founder member of the St. Ives Society of Artists in 1927. With regular entries to the Paris Salon he was awarded the Gold Medal in 1934. Park was among a small group of professional artists who carried on the tradition of St. Ives painting in the quiet years between the wars. He exhibited costal and fishing scenes at the Royal Academy, the Paris Salon and St. Ives Society of Artists. His work is held in the public collections of Manchester City Art, Salford Art Gallery and the Tate.
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    Albert Chevalier Taylor R.A. 1862 - 1928 A superb example by the artist best known for his long association with the Newlyn School. He was born at Leytonstone in Essex and won a scholarship to the Slade School at the age of seventeen. He moved to Newlyn in 1884 at the very beginnings of the Newlyn School of Painting founded by Stanhope Forbes. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1887 and won a medal at the Paris Salon in 1891. In 1895 he left Newlyn for London and became very successful eventually being elected a member of the Royal Academy.
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    Oil, 58x75cm. Bellingham Smith N.E.A.C. 1866 - 1922 Born in London, Hugh Bellingham Smith first studied art at the Slade School of Art under Legros and then in Paris under Constant. An artist of considerable talent he exhibited at many of the principal London galleries from 1891 and was elected a member of the New English Art Club. He painted in a very distinctive style with a wide range of subject matter, often visiting Yorkshire and Cornwall for inspiration. This excellent example retains its original frame.
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